Talk:Chiang Ching-kuo

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Taiwan Relations Act[edit]

The information about the Taiwan Relations Act was wrong, in that it argued that the US would defend Taiwan in any case of invasion. If you read it, you will notice that it does not specifically state this.

Hallo, if I well understood, Taiwan will be defended only if it does not provoke China, right? So for example, if the former President of Taiwan have had declare independence (after the referendum about it), USA would have not defended Taiwan from a military agression. --antonio.napoli (talk) 07:30, 24 August 2008 (UTC)

Yes it does: "to provide Taiwan with arms of a defensive character; and to maintain the capacity of the United States to resist any resort to force or other forms of coercion that would jeopardize the security, or the social or economic system, of the people on Taiwan."

Taiwanrox8(not a user) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.110.135.223 (talk) 18:45, 22 November 2008 (UTC)

Funeral cereals[edit]

"The state funeral ceremony was initially planned for Spring 2005, but was eventually delayed to winter 2005. It may be further delayed due to the recent death of Chiang Ching-kuo's oldest daughter-in-law, who had served as the de-facto head of the household since Chiang Fang-liang's death in 2004." In comparison, Chiang Kai-Shek article states: "The state funeral ceremony is planned to take place during the spring of 2006." Any news? --Oop 17:51, 28 June 2006 (UTC)

Christian denomination[edit]

Is it know which denomination of Christianity he belonged to? – Kaihsu (talk) 22:24, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Charlie Soong Jiashu, his great-grandfather, was a Methodist minister; his step-mother, Soong Mei-ling, went to Wellesley College, also a Methodist institution. DOR (HK) (talk) 06:53, 30 June 2008 (UTC)
He belonged to the Methodist church. http://books.google.ca/books?id=_5R2fnVZXiwC&pg=PA112&lpg=PA112&dq=Chiang+Ching-kuo+Methodist&source=bl&ots=YX7hozj4oc&sig=ZbaibHTZjQ77mmjQ9QrjkdDku7I&hl=en&ei=euXGScaoOOPfnQf9ov1G&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=2&ct=result

Homagetocatalonia (talk)

His wife would have been Orthodox? 81.156.180.208 (talk) 01:49, 1 April 2009 (UTC)

Request consensus discussion on addition of flag[edit]

The Flag of the Republic of China

Discussion is welcome.Arilang1234 (talk) 00:42, 9 November 2008 (UTC)

Legitimate/illegitimate children[edit]

Within Chinese society, it would be wrong to describe his two children as illegitimate, as they were acknowledged to be his children, ie, of his bloodline. Although it may have conflicted with his stated religion, 'polygamy' in its various forms was widely practised in his place and era and was accepted and expected. The important test of legitimacy was whether the mother took up with other men (which is very common in European cultures, but less so in Chinese culture, and therefore the conflict in the definition of legitimacy in the two cultures), in which case her children would really be considered bastards, and there was no evidence of this in this particular case. Even today in Chinese society, men such as Stanley Ho still openly practise polygamy. The children resulting from such relationships are not considered illegitimate according to Chinese thoughts. 81.156.180.208 (talk) 01:59, 1 April 2009 (UTC)

Chiang the dictator[edit]

I agree with some of the editors that Chiang was a dictator. But can we provide a reliable source for it? Unless we can do that, we need to stick to calling him a "president" (which can be documented by (unfortunately biased) ROC government publications). Readin (talk) 14:11, 15 June 2009 (UTC)

Qing Empire or Qing Empire China[edit]

Apparently we are having issues of whether the name of the Qing Empire is Qing Empire or Qing Empire China. So let us speak our points then. Why is it Qing Empire China and not Qing Empire? Liu Tao (talk) 17:48, 11 September 2009 (UTC)

Perhaps this is a case where we should say something like "Qing Empire (China)" or "Qing Empire (in modern-day China)". I think the point is that readers may not know where the Qing Empire was or that it was often equated with the concept of China and/or the Empire of China.
I notice the editors of the Qing Dynasty page don't have a consistent name either. One paragraph says

The dynasty was founded by the Manchu clan Aisin Gioro in what is today northeast China (also known as Manchuria). Starting in 1644 it expanded into China proper and its surrounding territories, establishing the Empire of the Great Qing (simplified Chinese: 大清国; traditional Chinese: 大清國; pinyin: Dà Qīng Guó, or simplified Chinese: 大清帝国; traditional Chinese: 大清帝國; pinyin: Dà Qīng Dìguó). Complete pacification of China was accomplished around 1683 under the Kangxi Emperor.

while the info box has the formal name as simply 大清 (Great Qing). Perhaps the question of the proper name should first be discussed on that page. Readin (talk) 19:24, 11 September 2009 (UTC)
Whether Chiang was born in "Zhongguo" is up for debate, but going back to the 1800s you'll see plenty of evidence that the Qing government uses the name "China" in English. Therefore, "Qing Dynasty China" is the best expression. HkCaGu (talk) 20:42, 11 September 2009 (UTC)
Can you verify that Qing used the name "China" in English? Liu Tao (talk) 20:49, 11 September 2009 (UTC)
The better question might be whether the English (or the Americans, Australians, Canadians et al.) used the term "China" for the Qing empire. Readin (talk) 20:55, 11 September 2009 (UTC)
I know, I'm asking the lad if he can verify what he claims. Liu Tao (talk) 21:07, 11 September 2009 (UTC)
What is the debate about whether he was born in "Zhongguo"? The article says he was born in Zhejiang, which seems to be pretty solidly in China Proper. The problem I have with "Qing Dynasty China" is that I'm not sure how I'm supposed to read it. Is it a proper name? is "Qing Dynasty" an adjective and "China" the actual location? Readin (talk) 20:55, 11 September 2009 (UTC)
Qing Dynasty is English translation. In English, "Dynasty" is like an era of a state. Problem is, the Qing Dynasty is actually an entirely different state. I dunno it's official english name, but I know the "official" name of the Qing Dynasty is Qing. If you read and listen closely to people talking, you'll notice that a lot of people uses "Qing Dynasty" as a noun instead of an adjective. Some people uses it as an adjective, but that's only in English. In Chinese, nobody uses Qing Dynasty as a adjective, it's always used as a noun. As for English, it's used as a noun as well as an adjective (different people uses it differently). Liu Tao (talk) 21:07, 11 September 2009 (UTC)

The name "Chiang Ching-kuo"[edit]

Hi,

While most of us here are familiar with the name of Chiang Ching-kuo as it appears commonly, the style we all see as the title, his name will be rendered differently in other dialects:

In Yue Cantonese (Jyutping), his name becomes zoeng ging gwok (because Pinyin jing1 in Jyutping is ging1). In Modern Cantonese this becomes Tseung King-kwok and in Postal Map Mandarin it's Chiang Kingkwo. Tseung is Modern Cantonese for jiang3.

WikiPro1981X (talk) 18:58, 26 April 2010 (UTC)

How is that even relevant? Every name can be rendered differently in various dialects. What you are posting aren't even different dialects, they are just different romanizations. --92.74.29.137 (talk) 03:30, 25 February 2017 (UTC)

Service in the Wehrmacht[edit]

Hi, where can I get info about his service in the Wehrmacht ?

There is a claim that Jiang Jingguo served in the Wehrmacht with picture to back it.

[[Image:http://history.cultural-china.com/chinaWH/upload/upfiles/2009-12/29/chiang_chingkuo_jiang_jingguo__president_of_the_republic_of_china57a2f7d7f88207e8ec50.jpg |Chiang Kai Shek's first son, Chiang Jingguo in German Wehrmacht dress.]]

See at http://history.cultural-china.com/en/46History7154.html

--- In Quest of Facts

I think you got the wrong guy. What you are after is not Chiang Ching-kuo, but his (adopted) brother Chiang Wei-kuo. If you can understand Chinese and have access to a library with Chinese literature, you can go looking for one of his biographies, they're quite detailed on his military past:
  • Wang Shichun (汪士淳), (1996). Travelling alone for a thousand mountains: The Life of Chiang Wei-kuo (千山獨行 蔣緯國的人生之旅), Tianxia Publishing, Taiwan. ISBN 957-621-338-x Parameter error in {{ISBN}}: Invalid ISBN.
  • Zhou Shao (周劭). The trifles of Chiang Wei-kuo's youth (青年蔣緯國瑣事), within the volume "Huanghun Xiaopin" (黃昏小品), Shanghai Guji Publishing House (上海古籍出版社), Shanghai, 1995. ISBN 7532512355
  • KWAN Kwok Huen (關國煊). Biography of Chiang Wei-kuo (蔣緯國小傳). Biography Literature (傳記文學), 78, 4.
Regards, -- 李博杰  | Talk contribs email 07:13, 7 August 2011 (UTC)
P.S. that website is quite horrible to use as an academic source, in my opinion. Avoid it if you're trying to write a paper. -- 李博杰  | Talk contribs email 07:16, 7 August 2011 (UTC)

File:Chiang Ching kuo.jpg Nominated for Deletion[edit]

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Same text[edit]

There're some exactly the same lines of text under "Moscow" and "Hostage claim". Perhaps the entire "Hostage claim" section can be removed then? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 178.91.44.97 (talk) 20:45, 22 November 2013 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Flags in infoboxes[edit]

Regarding this reversion, I removed the flags because they draw undue attention to one aspect of the subject's life, per MOS:INFOBOXFLAG. Is there some reason that they should be retained? Phlar (talk) 21:06, 8 February 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Recent attempts to change Taiwan to ROC[edit]

Regarding the recent attempts by an IP editor to change multiple instances of "Taiwan" to "Republic of China" or "ROC": for the past few years, the consensus in English Wikipedia has been to use Taiwan as the common name for the Republic of China. See this archived move discussion, this one and more recent discussions at Talk:Taiwan. Phlar (talk) 19:46, 12 July 2018 (UTC)

Succeeded Father's Post[edit]

The article claims that Chiang Ching-kuo succeeded his father's post as Premier of the Republic of China from 1972 to 1978, but the latest that Chiang Kai-Shek was the Premier of the Republic of China was in 1947, after which he was succeeded by Chang Chun, followed by 8 tenures held by 7 different Premiers before 1972. — Preceding unsigned comment added by AndersLeo (talkcontribs) 10:23, 25 September 2019 (UTC)