1110s

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The 1110s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1110, and ended on December 31, 1119.

Events

1110

By place[edit]

Levant[edit]
Europe[edit]
England[edit]
  • King Henry I has improvements made at Windsor Castle, including a chapel, so that he can use the castle as his formal residence.

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]
Religion[edit]

1111

By place[edit]

Levant[edit]
Europe[edit]
Ireland[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

1112

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Levant[edit]
Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]
Religion[edit]
  • Easter – The citizens of Laon in France, having proclaimed a commune, murder Bishop Waldric in his cathedral.

1113

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Levant[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

1114

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Earthquake[edit]
Religion[edit]

1115

By place[edit]

Levant[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • The Jin Dynasty (or Great Jin) is created by the Jurchen tribal chieftain Taizu (or Aguda). He establishes a dual-administration system: a Chinese-style bureaucracy to rule over northern and northeast China.
  • The 19-year-old Minamoto no Tameyoshi, Japanese nobleman and samurai, gains recognition by suppressing a riot against Emperor Toba at a monastery near Kyoto (approximate date).
Mesoamerica[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

1116

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
  • Autumn – Battle of Philomelion: Emperor Alexios I (Komnenos) leads an expedition into Anatolia and meets the Seljuk army under Sultan Malik Shah (near Philomelium). The Byzantines introduce a new battle formation of Alexios' devising, the parataxis (a defensive formation, consisting of a hollow square, with the baggage in the centre). During the battle, the Seljuk Turks mount several attacks on the formations, but all are repulsed. The Byzantine cavalry makes two counterattacks; the first is unsuccessful. But a second attack, led by Nikephoros Bryennios (the Younger), breaks the Seljuk forces, who then turn to flight. The following day Malik Shah again attacks, his army completely surrounding the Byzantines from all sides. The Seljuk Turks are once more repulsed, with many losses. Alexios claims the victory, and Malik Shah is forced to accept a peace treaty, in which he promises to respect the frontiers of the Byzantine Empire.[27][28]
Levant[edit]
  • Summer – The Crusaders under King Baldwin I of Jerusalem undertake an expedition to Egypt and march as far as Akaba on the Red Sea. After the local inhabitants flee from the town, Baldwin constructs castles in Akaba and on a nearby island. He leaves a garrison in both fortresses. The three Crusader strongholds – Montréal, Eilat and Graye – secure the control of the caravan routes between Syria and Egypt.[29]
  • Autumn – Baldwin I hastens to Tyre (modern Lebanon) and begins the construction of a new fortress, known as Scandelion Castle, at the Ladder of Tyre, which completes the blockade of the town from the mainland.[30]
Europe[edit]
England[edit]
Africa[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art and Music[edit]
  • Aak music is introduced to the Korean court, through a large gift of 428 musical instruments as well as 572 costumes and ritual dance objects from China, by Emperor Hui Zong of the Song Dynasty.
Religion[edit]

1117

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Seljuk Empire[edit]
Africa[edit]
Levant[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Education[edit]
Technology[edit]

1118

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
British Isles[edit]
Eastern Europe[edit]
France[edit]
Germany[edit]
Italy[edit]
Scandinavia[edit]
Spain[edit]
East Asia[edit]
Caucasus[edit]
Western Asia[edit]
South Asia[edit]

1119

By place[edit]

Levant[edit]
Europe[edit]
England[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
Technology[edit]
  • Zhu Yu, a Chinese historian, writes his book Pingzhou Table Talks (published this year), the earliest known use of separate hull compartments in ships. Zhu Yu's book is the first to report the use of a magnetic compass for navigation at sea. Although the first actual description of the magnetic compass is by another Chinese writer Shen Kuo in his Dream Pool Essays (published in 1088).

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

1110

1111

1112

1113

1114

1115

1116

1117

1118

1119

Deaths[edit]

1110

1111

1112

1113

1114

1115

1116

1117

1118

Pope Paschal II d. January 21, 1118
Baldwin I of Jerusalem d. April 2, 1118

1119


References[edit]

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  3. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, pp. 74–75. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  4. ^ Comyn, Robert (1851). History of the Western Empire, from its Restoration by Charlemagne to the Accession of Charles V. Vol I.
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  8. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 75. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  9. ^ Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 109. ISBN 2-7068-1398-9.
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